Tag Archives: Lagbaja

THE MASK BY Ikoro Iyineleda

maskkOne that has nothing to hide will not strive to conceal it. Thus the reason behind the cosmetics, the make-up, the dress sense that the average woman ever strives to have – to that extent where she even would it be imposed on the average man, which he then usually ignores. For the fact it is that the woman has a whole lot much more to hide in terms of that lack of beauty that she thereby strives to conceal, than the man that cares not how he looks. And it is that same fact that has women ever strive to conceal the passion for pleasure that would the man believe she cares not for sex; and that has the man, not being driven by the same intensity of passion, bother not about hiding his own – less intense – passion for that same sex. And, not only because of that part of human nature that believes all men (and women) are inherently the same, but also because the man rarely ever strives to conceal his passion – for he has not as much to conceal as the woman does; all a man has to do is spend a second’s attention on a woman, and she will instantly conclude that he is also burning with the passion that ever sears her flesh – and, at that moment, would his be doused by hers.

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Lagbaja’s music, Mumus and Nigerians

The following are words of Lagbaja (in response to Okey Ndibe) as previously published on saharareporters.com on the 6th of August, 2013 and reproduced here for the benefit of a larger pool of Nigerians:

Lagbaja

Dear Okey Ndibe: Thank you for sounding the alarm in a way that should make us reflect deeper. Mumu is not a condition I proudly proclaim. It was with a heavy heart that I came to this shocking realization that we are indeed a country of mumus. Harsh as it might sound, no other explanation would suffice. It is apparent that the “leaders” know that they would always get away with whatever incredible schemes they concoct because, amongst other reasons,

(a) the mumu people they “lead” are no different from their mumu “leaders” in character

(b) the mumu people are gullible, superstitious and naive

(c) there are no consequences for criminal acts if you belong to the right group

(d) these mumus never demand accountability from their “leaders”

(e) the mumus expect their rulers to loot or would otherwise consider them foolish Continue reading Lagbaja’s music, Mumus and Nigerians