LETTER TO THE SON OF MAN- VOL.2 by Adeyemi Kolawole Adeojo Hannibal

Dear Son of Man,

 

Your response, which was succinct and aptly posited, dissects the hearts of men at its vainglorious and peripatetic best. I was effusively excited to read from you. I wonder why we cannot have on earth as it is in heaven, as the level of privations had made more people less concerned if they lived or died. They only trot along in daily routine of dashed expectations and forlorn hopes.

 

Just few weeks ago, the near fragile air of peace pervading the west coast of Africa was almost shattered when a country, sucked in by Senegal and whose only outlet to the world is the Atlantic Ocean, nearly dispelled the air of peace with a sit-tight, self-proclaimed leader biting more than he can chew. That vicious air of volatility was almost invited upon the hitherto, relatively peaceful region by Yahya Jammeh, who seized power as a gun-wielding , dare-devil, young officer in 1994, albeit, in a bloodless coup that usurped Dawda Jawara. In the usual characteristics of African leaders who came into power through the blazing Continue reading

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Crossroads, homeward. The Journey of a Brazilian Babalawo by ‘Lakunle Jaiyesimi

While the Nigerian state is being divided on religious lines, the Middle East gets dichotomized with the spilled blood of the dead and injured, the Mexican wall goes up in defiance, Britain is exiting the European Union at all cost, Lybia is tearing her own skin out of her body and so on, individuals around the world, as is in this case, Paulo Jose Monteiro da Silva with his family is living the life of a man on a journey back home, irrespective of how many crossroads he meets on the way.

Like so many other naturalized Brazillians, having been born and raised in Brazil after many generations of inbreeding and cross-cultural relationships, Paulo knew no other culture until, reading through the newspapers Continue reading

Racism in India: And “Yannick passed away…” by ‘Lakunle Jaiyesimi

“You’re standing at a zoo, and looking at a caged animal, admiring it, scrutinizing every aspect of it, observing its walk, its skin. Now imagine you’re that caged animal and people are gawking at you like you’re an alien, like you don’t belong. That is how black citizens of African nations say they feel in India, they aren’t caged but they might as well be.” – Sarakshi Rai.

Yannick before and afterA few days ago in Greater Noida, some Hausa boys were allegedly beaten up by an Indian mob, while the reverse was published in the media (that Indians were beaten up by the Hausa boys). Whereas, the reality was that an Indian boy, with rich but uneducated father, snapped pictures of a Hausa boy and was asked to delete same but would not budge. He called his father and that led to the Hausa boys being attacked. This event led to sabotage on public facilities that fed the Africans (including but not limited to the disruption of power supply); this, ultimately leading to the ejection of Africans, who had to resort to emergent searching for new shelter, with its attendant challenges.

Sometimes, it is a wonder what globalization, in the sense of globetrotting (let’s content ourselves with singly Continue reading

Dying In Public by ‘Lakunle Jaiyesimi

from 071208

“Felix X is dead” was the bold newspaper headline that was never made. It never saw the light of day, but remained on the whispering lips of all and sundry.

On that fateful morning, the neighbourhood of a very old patriarch was roused from slumber to hear the news going round of the death of the youngest and most promising man in their neighbourhood. There and beyond, stories of the death of worthless men, accompanied with stretched portraits of their fat-stuffed faces, graced the front pages of the National Dailies. Contrived smiles concealed the atrocious underbelly of corporate and disguised crimes lived through their years on earth. They died and a simulation of public service on public news sheets is their consolation.

“Felix X is dead” but no one cared to mention it. The stars shone at night; and the Sun rose at dawn. Continue reading

#PAUSIBILITY: WE ARE AFRICANS! by Adebayo Coker

(Editorial note: This was received about a week ago.)

africaaaMy dear people, I must start by congratulating us for the consolidation of democracy. Two weeks ago we had both Gubernatorial and House of Assembly elections. Even though there were pockets of skirmishes, I can submit that we are all determined to make this system work and with time the imbroglio will be dealt with, then our nation will be one of the exemplified democracies in the world.

I could not write my column last week because I was busy coordinating my son’s first birthday. As I moved around town during that period, a thought kept coming to mind: If posters could cry, we all would be flapping our arms and feet through the pool of tears that our nation space would be submerged in. Also if posters could laugh we all would be running with a finger in each ear in a bid to block out the maddening Continue reading

BIG BROTHER AFRICA: BETWEEN IDRIS AND TAYO by ‘Lakunle Jaiyesimi

TayooThe Big Brother Africa show has just exhausted its 63 days on air and Idris Sultan, a Tanzanian photographer, won the ‘hitherto highly’ coveted prize. It will be satiating to put on record that the reaction of many Nigerians, and Africans at large, was that of chagrin at the shortchanging of Tayo Faniran, the Nigerian – Oyo State bride that was widely loved for his discipline, honesty and entertaining participation in the Big Brother house.

So much has been reported on this and I should say Big Brother Africa show, or the likes, is not a television programme I ever saw. I was persuaded Continue reading