Tag Archives: Drugs

I’m in a mess. ASUU is on strike. Again. For the umpteenth time, that is

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“I find that the great thing in this

world is not so much where we

stand as in what direction we are

moving: To reach the port of

heaven, we must sail sometimes

with the wind and sometimes

against it – but we must sail, and

not drift, nor lie at the anchor.” –

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

(29 August 1809 – 8 October 1894)

The name, Musa Parad Isiaka, is that of a fictional character that I intend to be the protagonist in a novel. I’d been nursing the idea of this novel for some time now. For lack of ideas at the moment however, I have elected to gloss over a short period in the life of one Nigerian academic, who goes by the same name. Hence, whatever narrative you read below differs greatly from that of my novel protagonist, at least in their conception.

This period, I innocently wish (like a child is wont to) would ultimately become somehow inculcated into the novel, as events that constitute a major telling bulk of the novel. And when it does, it may just come up as a dream that can’t either harm or make (I’m not here referring to a prophetic dream, mind you). I plead, no one should spank me for all I’ve said and will say, especially for having a “head full of cobwebs”, like my mentor would say, if you know what he means.

If you must know, my usual reaction every time he said it was to gently rub Continue reading I’m in a mess. ASUU is on strike. Again. For the umpteenth time, that is

“Performance-enhancing Drugs for Writers” – X X

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Grant Snider of Incidental Comics gives us not only a comic but a poem within it; more of a caveat….

I don’t advocate drug use – unless it leads to great works of literature.

Injustice against a drug man, addict, dealer, pusher or just a druggist

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RADIO SHOW:   Good Morning Naija

STATION:             MeroëRadio

TIME:                    25 hours G.M.T. every single day, no be small thing

Today’s Issue:    Injustice against a drug man, addict, dealer, pusher or just a druggist

I welcome you to another episode of the radio show, ‘Good Morning, Naija’ on MeroëRadio. This episode go bam. We wan focus small on wetin dem dey call Injustice as the thing recently affect one small part of an ogbonge profession of we country, Naija. That profession na Pharmacy.

Wetin dem dey call injustice?

According to Oxford Advanced Learner’s dictionary, injustice na “the fact of a situation being unfair and of people not being treated equally.”

So, wetin concern us for this matter sef; injustice, pharmacy? Well, me sef no know o. All wetin I know na say e get one Pharmacy like that wey dem dey call HealthPlus. Na the magodo branch for Lagos the injustice happen. And na against the Pharmacist wey dey work  for there e happen.

The antenna of MeroëRadio, na em catch the news on Sunday, 2nd December, 2012. The antenna see robbers, daredevils, as dem dey enter the Magodo Continue reading Injustice against a drug man, addict, dealer, pusher or just a druggist

“Doctors, major problem in health care” – Oga of Pharmacists • “You’re insincere” – Oga of Doctors

These-Are-notMYwords, they are Punch’s Leke Baiyewu’s.

“Pharmacists have accused medical doctors of posing threats to the lives of Nigerians through unethical practices. They challenged them to an open debate over their activities in the health sector.

The President, Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria, Mr. Olumide Akintayo, who spoke to our correspondent on the telephone on Friday, accused doctors of breeding quacks through the training of auxiliary nurses and health attendants in private health institutions.

He said, “Medical doctors are about the biggest problem in health care. In Nigeria today, 99 per cent of them stock drugs in their private health facilities for prescription to patients. This is wrong; it is illegal. They constitute the biggest threat to lives in the health sector.

“Find out who trains auxiliary nurses and health attendants. When the trainees leave the setting, they spread to the communities to perpetrate illegalities.”

The PSN boss argued that pharmacists could not be held responsible for the purpose for which a drug is bought.

He blamed the unrestricted over-the-counter sale of prescription drugs on regulatory agencies. He called for the empowering of the Pharmacists Council of Nigeria to enforce and prosecute. He also urged the government to budget more funds for the sector.

Akintayo said, “As for drugs, the problem in Nigeria is that there is unhindered access to all categories of drugs. The regulatory agencies are not empowered financially too. Government earmarks about five per cent of its budget for health care, compared to 13 per cent of the minimum required.”

The Chairman, Nigeria Medical Association, Dr. Francis Faduyile, however, said pharmacists were insincere with their allegations.

According to him, training of nurses and health workers in private hospitals had been banned in Lagos State.

“Pharmacists consult within their shops and this is beyond their work. It is part of the rights of a doctor to prescribe and to leverage on a number of drugs. The major question is, ‘Are pharmacists ready to stop consulting in their shops?’

“If you go to any pharmacy to complain of headache or fever, drugs will be prescribed for you. Go there with the result of a blood test; you will see them giving you drugs. It is not about professional fight; let us do the right thing.”