Islamization of Nigeria: The example of the Mexican Border Wall by ‘Lakunle Jaiyesimi

What the Mexican Wall does to a people on either side is what divisive words do. It is not more Mexican than it is of American since Mexicans did not initiate the idea for the wall and largely do not favour its construction. The newly inaugurated President of the United States of America, Donald J. Trump, did.

For convenience, let’s be content with the term flying in mainstream media, ‘Mexican Wall’ rather than the American Wall. It is a symbol that aims to herald the isolationist policies of the new government of USA. As if slamming the door in Mexico’s face was not enough, the latter has to pay for the construction of the wall, 100 percent. How, even though the Mexican government has said her sovereign self will pay for no such construction, while Trump insists they will? Continue reading

#PAUSIBILITY: The Gravitas Of These Tickets by Adebayo Coker

xtianmuslimI have not been disturbed, in anyway  and at anytime, by the religiousity of anyone in arriving at my conclusion. Your Christianity or Islam, better still, your religious belief is not my problem in as much as you are saddled with a responsibility and you deliver expressly, my unreserved ovation will go to you.

Now that we have Christian-Muslim Ticket on one hand and Muslim-Christian Ticket on the other, where do we go from here?  Now that the so much touting of religious hegemony has been removed on both sides of the coin by the two dominant parties in our polity, I ask you again, Continue reading

#PAUSIBILITY: EXCUSE ME! THIS IS A SECULAR STATE by Adebayo Coker

Fashola-360x225My good friend and brother, Jeff Underwood asked me earlier in the week if I’m considering posting any other thing on my blog apart from politics. It’s a good question as I have asked myself the same over and again; in fact, I attempted being apolitical on my blog sometime back but to tell you the truth, there is no way one would demand change in this clime without being political, a passivist or Dokubo-like, especially with the rodents that parade themselves as leaders because people with good brains lack the will to offer themselves for service. We must start considering our stance. Enough said.

The Government of the Federation or of a State shall not adopt any religion as State Religion.

Section 10 of the 1999 Constitution of The Federal Republic of Nigeria.

The motto of the Federal Republic of Nigeria shall be Unity and Faith, Peace and Progress. Accordingly, national integration shall be actively encouraged, whilst discrimination on the grounds of place of origin, sex, religion, status, ethnic or linguistic association or ties shall be prohibited. Continue reading

My plea to the people of Israel: Liberate yourselves by liberating Palestine by Desmond Tutu

desmondThe past weeks have witnessed unprecedented action by members of civil society across the world against the injustice of Israel’s disproportionately brutal response to the firing of missiles from Palestine.

If you add together all the people who gathered over the past weekend to demand justice in Israel and Palestine – in Cape Town, Washington, D.C., New York, New Delhi, London, Dublin and Sydney, and all the other cities – this was arguably the largest active outcry by citizens around a single cause ever in the history of the world.

A quarter of a century ago, I participated in some well-attended demonstrations against apartheid. I never imagined we’d see demonstrations of that size again, but last Saturday’s turnout in Cape Town was as big if not bigger. Participants included young and old, Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists, blacks, whites, reds and greens … as one would expect from a vibrant, tolerant, multicultural nation. Continue reading

#PAUSIBILITY: STERLING COMMENTS by Adebayo Coker

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I considered starting AXIOM, my own blog last week as there was so much anxiety in me to share #PAUSIBILTY: PRAYERS FOR THE THOMASES which was reworded to #PAUSIBILITY: SEE HOW LUTH IS LOOTING THE FUTURE OF THIS COUNTRY on www.omojuwa.com by the administrator(s) of the website at their own discretion.

Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary Third Edition describes axiom as a statement or principle which is generally accepted to be true, but need not be so. The example that was given in further explanation of that word is a perfect fit to what we are faced with at the moment: it is a widely held axiom that governments should not negotiate with terrorists.

These past few days have seen many Nigerians comment on the statements made by two prominent USA Senators (based on their personal assessment) concerning the situation of Nigeria. Both Senators had at some time in their political careers took a shot at becoming the President of the United States. They are also hi-tech diplomats that must have interacted with different world leaders at different fora. They must have known the corruption fecundity and diplomatic infertility of our leaders. Continue reading

“No more hell. Adam and Eve, just a fable. God has changed”? – Pope Francis

For the benefit of those who haven’t read this declaration, more or less, here it is uncut and as published in Diversity Chronicle on the 5th of December, 2013.

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Here’s a quick reaction before reading the article itself as ‘copied&pasted’ from same content:

“A couple of prominent Catholic cardinals have responded to Pope Francis’ declarations by leaving the church. Cardinal Arinze of Nigeria asked, “what do we stand for if we declare that truth is relative? On the contrary, truth exists independently of our personal feelings. All of this talk of love and tolerance is hollow if we have no identity of our own, if we stand for nothing. I charge that Francis has become a heretic, and that he is not a valid Pope. Indeed, Continue reading

Ijebu people, stinginess and Juju: The Alare apology

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It has been many thousands of years since the establishment of the city of Ijebu somewhere in-between the city of Lagos and the old Oyo Empire within present-day Nigeria. Interestingly, whether one can say the city was established at all or that it has always existed with the advent of the Universe (just like any other city for that matter) should ordinarily constitute a complexity.

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There are a number of things that are unique about Ijebu and the Ijebu people; talk about an Ijebu participation in the war against colonialism, the Yemoja war (the war was christened Yemoja because this was where the war was hottest between the Ijebus and the British. There is a Yemoja natural swimming pool, where the British used to relax during war-breaks located in the Ijebu town, Yemoja till tomorrow).

 

‘Segun Osoba, a renowned Professor of History, once ended a narrative on a similar subject with a funny anecdote about one of the few Ijebu converts to Christianity. This particular man became a ‘Pastor’ as is commonplace today; once, a member of his congregation vexed him (names and details withheld) to a degree that he had to take off his pastoral regalia (not sure what they used to call that), thus revealing the hitherto concealed attire of a Juju Priest.

 

That anecdote represented the suspicion with which the Ijebus held Christianity while yet practicing it. Insufficient to confirm though, but this suspicion is quite ubiquitous today that even the Europeans themselves have come to establish same with their attitude of faith-needlessness. One of the reasons why the current Pope has chosen to launch his twitter account @Pontifex ‘to reclaim lost sheep’. However, this is far from being the subject of discourse here.

 

What the interest is herein is the attitude of the world to the Ijebu race. I refer to the world because everything you hear about the Ijebu people and spoken by ‘just’ anybody around the world is almost bound to be derogatory. This has gotten so endemic (you can say pandemic, if you want) especially in contemporary times that everyone seems to want to distant itself from an Ijebu ‘CityMan’; last time I even noticed a baby suspiciously eyeing an Ijebu man. I no know wetin the guy do the pikin o!

 

WETIN IJEBU PEOPLE DO THE WORLD SEF?

 

Ijebu people are stingy. Ijebu people are Juju-rich. Ijebu people are wicked. Whatever bad, wicked, wrong, unwholesome you can think of or need a definition for, just think about any Ijebu person you know and you have your definition. That’s how the world thinks. The bandwagon effect!

 

There is a general belief in the world today and that is, if a man has three children for instance and one of them marries an Ijebu person; that child is counted lost. So, the man is deemed to have only two children. It is said that a man or woman completely forgets its home as soon as it marries an Ijebu spouse. It’s worse than you may think if you have never heard these lines before.

 

One piece of advice parents passionately give their children or guardians, their wards, over and above any other, is never to marry an Ijebu, never even date such. In fact, the thought that friendship sometimes leads to intimacy and then to dating and then marriage makes parents advise their children against friendship with any Ijebu personality. I would wonder, is this not a calculated crime against the humanity of Ijebu to keep them perpetually isolated? Well, who cares?

 

The case against the Ijebus is premised on the presumption  that they are extremely fetish. Unfortunately, this writer is unaware of an adequate word to describe the extent to which people passionately describe how fetish the Ijebus are. So, we’ll content ourselves with fetish…just fetish!

 

This is what gives birth to the fetish enslavement (nay, brainwashing) of spouses by their Ijebu partners to the point where the latter forget their families. A necessary extension from this is spouse-ritual, especially money-rituals or the like.

 

Another, most-unfortunate, personality trait ascribed to the Ijebus by the world is stinginess. The Ijebus are said to be a stingy tribe of people. They will rather die of hunger (no other tribe in the world dies of hunger but malnourishment except the Ijebus) than spend their ‘hard-earned’ money on themselves; talk nothing about giving people anything.

 

The world (by this, I mean children of the children of the children of the great great super great grand children of certain people in an almost forgotten past, who have had varying degrees of experience – mostly unwholesome – with Ijebus) has come to tag Ijebus as stingy, fetish and all that doomed adjectives. But that’s not to say, in contemporary times, there are no such Ijebus known to be stingy and fetish.  Of course, they abound!

 

In fact, this writer has met more ‘stingy-er’ and ‘fetish-er’ Ijebus, probably much more than anyone else. Maybe! He has, as a matter of chance, also met generous Ijebus; pious Christians and Muslims, even to a fault. If anyone hasn’t, it will do everyone a lot of good if such provides that information.

 

Hence, this Ijebu representation of all that is good and bad can, of human nature, not be peculiar to the Ijebu peoples of the world but an essential part of human need for self-preservation and existence (as selfish as that may be).

 

To resolve this stalemate, this writer went out to interview a number of people and what kept coming up, outrightly absent on Internet pages, is Alare! Alare! Who or what is Alare?

 

It was gathered that Alare was (is, pardon me) a god of the entire Ijebu people. As a god of the Ijebus, Alare demanded and secured absolute allegiance from his subjects. This allegiance embodies the entire ownership of all Ijebus as entities and in extension all properties belonging to the Ijebus. Follows the old saying, “Eni tó l’erú ló l’erù” – that is, he who owns the slave owns his properties.

 

 

It was therefore generally believed that all Ijebus were properties of Alare and as such all properties belonging to an Ijebu were in extension properties of Alare. No Ijebu person was allowed to make use of his own property without the permission of Alare. How much more, if he needed to give out same to someone else. Usually, Alare would not permit that.

 

So, it was that Ijebus were thrifty with the use of their properties for selves. That probably was where the idea of stinginess came about. I doubt if that really still happens today.

 

However, the possession and use of juju coupled with spouse-murder allegations against the Ijebus may not be in anyway linked with Alare. As a matter of fact, there probably could be no explanation for this especially if the concerned persons are not ready to see reasons and the fact that this too isn’t peculiar to the Ijebus, if at all it happens.

This will constitute a good discourse if there are contributions from all concerned or affected; after which there will be sequels to detail personal experiences and possible way-out.

 

In conclusion, the city of Ijebu exists till today with a paramount ruler, a system of governance, monarchical and democratic. There are successful marriages as much as there are failed ones, just like it happens everywhere else. Today, there are non-Ijebus married to Ijebus and who have lived to ‘ripe’ old age (if there’s anything like that) before dying naturally or still living. And their children (part-Ijebu, part-non-Ijebu) are living, growing and succeeding.

 

Just a few popular mentions:

 

– Uncle Tai Solarin was Ijebu, yet he gave his life – not just his money – for the advancement of the course of humanity. He never killed his wife; she only just died recently, many years after Uncle Tai has gone.

– Chief Obafemi Awolowo needs no mention regarding what he also did for humanity. Obafemi Awolowo University, Cocoa House and Free Education (not only for his children but for children of the country). What better way to be generous? And his wife? Anyone can still pay her a visit at her home in Ikenne , kicking, after 25 years of Pa Awo’s exit.

–  Prof. Wole Soyinka…what can (or can’t?) you say about this iconoclast?

–  Mike Adenuga, M.D. Globacom nko?

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We therefore close the curtain on the scene that, as an enlightened generation, we have responsibility to ourselves and to the unborn generations; to make history and the future a palatable drama of life.

 

I am Ijebu and I see all allegations against the Ijebu  as diversionary to say the least.

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